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Showing posts from April, 2016

Your code smells? Let it!

Code smell is a term used pretty commonly in software development.  It is a way for one developer to express to another that they're experience is telling them something is wrong, even though they don't see it on the surface.  In fact, that's what it's supposed to mean.

But software developers don't do well with "trust your gut" as a methodology, so we make an effort to identify and quantify things like this.  For that reason, over time we have managed to put together lists of things in your code that are "code smells" and explain why we don't like them.

For illustration, I'm going to refer to personal experience and talk about an application I'm currently working on.  A common code-smell that developers will talk about is singletons.  So that will be the basis for my example, but the message should be clear even without the example.

Why does it smell?
The first thing you should ask the developer on your team who's most knowledge…

Dependency Injection - You're doing it wrong!

So I have worked at a lot of places and seen a lot of different styles of programming.  Early on in my career, I became acquainted with the concept of dependency injection.  It was a hard topic to grasp, but I have learned understand it deeply.  Now, when I step into a new application that uses it, I can very quickly see the flaws in the implementation, and there's a common one I want to talk about today: global singletons.  But we'll get to that in a minute.

What is Dependency Injection?
Dependency Injection is exactly what it sounds like.  You use it to inject your dependencies. The unique part about Dependency Injection though, is that you can do this at runtime.  Now this sounds fancier than it is.  By inject we don't mean they're downloaded for you.  You still have to have all of the parts installed where you want to run your app.

Dependency Injection is somewhat of a complicated topic to a newbie.  Let's start with defining the word dependency here.  Specific…