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Javascript - First Class

It may or may not surprise you to know that I have a heavy Javascript background. While my first language was VB6, I don't think I've ever delved into any language quite as deeply as I have with Javascript. I used to use a gnome back-end to build very complex projects in Javascript. Therefore, you might know how cool of a concept it is to me to use Javascript as a First Class Language.

Much more exciting however, is that Microsoft is doing just that, and in Visual Studio no less!  This means that we not only get intellisense and other features.  But now we can code entire applications in Javascript as if it were .NET at its core.

It may not seem like much, but it means that you could theoretically code pure Javascript from Logger to Server to Front End and it could seriously simplify programming in the future.  This is something I'd like to see available in more languages, but if Javascript is the start, then so be it.  Hoorah for JS!

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