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Prepare for a Programming Career

This post is a result of a question asked on one of my favorite tech forums.

As a programmer I spend a lot of time making sure I'm current.  I like to know what the industry thinks of my choices of languages and I try to make sure I'm learning the most profitable ones.

When I'm looking to keep current, it's important to know how skilled my potential future interviewer will be when I go to sit down for a programming interview.  Sometimes there is a great deal of variance, but overall, this site is a great reference for what types of questions you might get in an interview.  I can't count the times I've been asked about the differences between a class and a struct.

It's important to prepare for fizzbuzz questions.  If you can't answer a fizzbuzz question in the language, then you shouldn't be listing it on your resume.

I thrive on the internet and the massive information that streams about.  That's why I keep up so closely with Stack Overflow and DZone.

It's true that I like a good working environment.  More than that though, I want a manager who respects the importance of quality in software development.  I always ask them about their Joel Test score during my phone interview.  I have had a potentially great interview turn nasty after asking them about this, which proved to me that it wasn't a job I wanted.

I read programming books regularly.  I'm currently trying to get through SICP.  The three books on this list will likely be review for me, but I want to read them anyway.

Short post today, got stuff to do.

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